Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Surprising Water Facts

 
-1.1 billion people lack access to an improved water supply – approximately one in six people on earth.
– 2.6 billion people in the world lack access to improved sanitation.
– Less than 1% of the world’s fresh water (or about 0.007% of all water on earth) is readily accessible for direct human use.
– A person can live weeks without food, but only days without water.
– A person needs 4 to 5 gallons of water per day to survive.
– The average American individual uses 100 to 176 gallons of water at home each day. The average African family uses about 5 gallons of water each day.
– Millions of women and children spend several hours a day collecting water from distant, often-polluted sources.
– Water systems fail at a rate of 50% or higher.
– Every $1 spent on water and sanitation creates on average another $8 in costs averted and productivity gained.
– Almost two in three people lacking access to clean water live on less $2 a day.
– Poor people living in the slums often pay 5-10 times more for per liter of water than wealthy people living in the same city.

Third of Americans could be diabetes by 2050 if not do something to reverse the current trend , providing the government ‘s analysis shows .

In 2012 , diabetes cost up to a total 245 billion dollars in the U.S. alone. In 2007 , costing 174 billion dollars , like that in just 5 years , costs have increased 43 % in the treatment of diabetes . The increase also comes with the cost of diabetes people increase .
american-diabetesToday, approximately 26 million children and adults ( 8.3 % of the U.S. population ) in the United States have diabetes , and about 79 million Americans are diagnosed with prediabetes and risk of developing diabetes really sound , as the analysis of government . Third of Americans could be diabetes by 2050 if not do something to reverse the current trend , providing the government ‘s analysis shows .

High blood pressure static by CDC

A Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S. Make Control Your Goal. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the first and fourth leading causes of death for all Americans. High Blood Pressure Basics. 67 million American adults—1 in 3—have high blood pressure. High blood pressure contributes to ~1,000 deaths/day. When your blood pressure is high, you are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke, and you are 3 times more likely to die from heart disease. 69% of people who have a first heart attack, 77% of people who have a first stroke, and 74% of people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure. Annual estimated costs associated with high blood pressure: $51 billion, including $47.5 billion in direct medical expenses. Blood Pressure Control. Only about half of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. Reducing average population systolic blood pressure by only 12–13 mmHg could reduce stroke by 37%, coronary heart disease by 21%, deaths from cardiovascular disease by 25%, and deaths from all causes by 13%.
A Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S. Make Control Your Goal. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the first and fourth leading causes of death for all Americans. High Blood Pressure Basics. 67 million American adults—1 in 3—have high blood pressure. High blood pressure contributes to ~1,000 deaths/day. When your blood pressure is high, you are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke, and you are 3 times more likely to die from heart disease. 69% of people who have a first heart attack, 77% of people who have a first stroke, and 74% of people with chronic heart failure have high blood pressure. Annual estimated costs associated with high blood pressure: $51 billion, including $47.5 billion in direct medical expenses. Blood Pressure Control. Only about half of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. Reducing average population systolic blood pressure by only 12–13 mmHg could reduce stroke by 37%, coronary heart disease by 21%, deaths from cardiovascular disease by 25%, and deaths from all causes by 13%. Make Control Your Goal, Every Day. Check your blood pressure regularly—at home, at a doctor’s office, or at a pharmacy. Eat a healthy diet with more fruits, vegetables, potassium, and whole grains and less sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol . Read nutrition labels and lower your sodium intake. Most of the sodium we eat comes from processed and restaurant foods. About 90% of Americans eat too much sodium. Quit smoking—or don’t start. 1-800-QUIT-NOW or Smokefree.gov. Adults should limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men. Get active and maintain a healthy weight. Aim for 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every week. This infographic was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention in support of achieving the Million Hearts® initiative goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.

Extra vitamin D doesn’t cut high blood pressure: study

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – In older people with low vitamin D levels and a common type of high blood pressure, vitamin D supplements do not appear to lower blood pressure, according to a new study from the UK.

Previous research has linked low vitamin D levels to high blood pressure, heart disease and even early death (see Reuters Health article of Nov 25, 2011 here: http://reut.rs/1a4Atg6.)

But few studies have looked at whether vitamin D supplements bring down blood pressure – especially in those with high isolated systolic blood pressure, which is when the top number of a blood pressure reading is greater than 140 millimeters of mercury (mmHg).

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that systolic blood pressure should be below 120 mmHg and the diastolic pressure reading (the bottom number) should be less than 80 mmHg.

Healthy blood levels of the circulating form of vitamin D are thought to be about 30 nanograms/milliliter (ng/mL) or higher.

For the new study, Witham and his colleagues randomly assigned 159 people with high isolated systolic blood pressure and low vitamin D levels to one of two groups between June 2009 and May 2011.

While one group received 100,000 international units of vitamin D3 every three months for a year, the other group received a placebo pill.

Overall, the treatment group’s vitamin D levels increased – from an average of 18 ng/mL to an average of 28 ng/mL, while the placebo group’s remained low.

There were, however, no significant changes in blood pressure in either group. Participants’ average blood pressure at the beginning and the end of study was 163/78 mmHg.

Read more: http://news.yahoo.com/extra-vitamin

Why did the U.S. International Earth Environment University give an award to Enagic?

This is because the Enagic water technology produces acidic water for cleaning which reduces the necessity for other detergent products. This acidic water is also highly beneficial and prevents water pollution. By drinking Kangen water™, the demand for plastic bottles, which are a major source of environmental pollution, is reduced. When making electrolyzed water, both Kangen and acidic waters are produced. These waters benefit sanitation (as an antiseptic) and in health (with regards to common illnesses) thereby improving the environment. Drinking Kangen water™ is practicing preventive medicine, hence contributing to the significant reduction of public medical costs.

See award at: http://kangensui.us/enagic-gold-standard/

Health rankings: USA is living longer, but sicker

Americans are living longer, with fewer deaths from heart disease and cancer, but more chronic illnesses, an annual snapshot of the USA’s health shows.

The 2012 America’s Health Rankings highlight troubling levels of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and sedentary behavior. Medical advances are allowing more people to live with those conditions.

The bottom line: Americans “are living longer, sicker” with more chronic illness, says Reed Tuckson of theUnited Health Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation that sponsors the report with the American Public Health Association and the Partnership for Prevention.

Medical advances are allowing more people to live with obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure.

 

 Americans are living longer, with fewer deaths from heart disease and cancer, but more chronic illnesses, an annual snapshot of the USA’s health shows.

The 2012 America’s Health Rankings highlight troubling levels of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and sedentary behavior. Medical advances are allowing more people to live with those conditions.

The bottom line: Americans “are living longer, sicker” with more chronic illness, says Reed Tuckson of theUnited Health Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation that sponsors the report with the American Public Health Association and the Partnership for Prevention.

STORY: Living to 100: 80% are women, report shows

For the sixth consecutive year, Vermont tops the list of healthiest states, says the report, which uses data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Medical Association, Census Bureau and even the FBI. It looks at 24 measures of health, including tobacco and alcohol abuse, exercise, infectious diseases, crime rates, public health funding, access to immunizations, premature birth rates and cancer and heart disease rates.

States that are most successful on the rankings “have good results in a majority of the conditions we evaluate,” Tuckson says. But states such as Mississippi and Louisiana, which tied for last place, “are over represented in key measures like tobacco consumption, lack of exercise and obesity — the fundamentals,” he adds.

Although socioeconomic factors play an important role in some states’ consistent low rankings, “we know it is possible to improve; states are capable of doing that,” says Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association. Key to that effort is “taking lessons from things they do well and applying them more vigorously to the things they are not doing well.”

Louisiana has low rates of binge drinking and a high rate of childhood immunization, but it ranks in the bottom five states on 13 of 24 health measures, including obesity and diabetes.

But “we don’t have to accept those” indicators, says Karen DeSalvo, health commissioner for New Orleans. She says an extensive effort is underway “to get us to the place we need to be … to be a healthy state.”

States that showed the most substantial improvement in rankings include New Jersey (up nine places on the list); Maryland (up five). Alabama, Colorado, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Rhode Island each moved up three.

Among the unhealthy behaviors the report cites:

  • More than a quarter (26.2%) of all Americans are sedentary, defined as not doing any physical activity outside of work for 30 days. But it’s 36% in Mississippi, and 35.1% in both Tennessee and West Virginia.
  • 27.8% of U.S. adults are obese, defined as being roughly 30 or more pounds over a healthy weight. That’s 66 million people — more than the entire population of the United Kingdom. In even the least obese state, Colorado, more than 20% of the population is obese.
  • The percentage of adults with diabetes is 9.5% nationally, but it’s 12% or higher in West Virginia, South Carolina and Mississippi.
  • 30.8% of U.S. adults have high blood pressure, but that ranges from a low of 22.9% in Utah to a high of 40.1% in Alabama. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a primary risk for cardiovascular disease — problems related to the heart and the blood vessels.

“There’s no way that this country can possibly afford the medical care costs and consequences of these preventable chronic illnesses,” says Tuckson. “We have two freight trains headed directly into each other unless we take action now.”

“People have to be successful at taking accountability for their own health-related decisions.”

Source: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2012/12/10/health-rankings-states/1759299/

American Health Ranking: http://www.americashealthrankings.org/Rankings

 

 

 

The chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA):

PFOA is present in trace amounts in up to 98% of Americans. Previous research has linked PFOA exposure to unhealthy cholesterol levels and other risk factors for heart disease, but the potential health hazards posed by the chemical remain largely unknown.

See news:

Household Chemical Linked to Heart Disease

 

DIABETES FAST FACT:

  • Diabetes affects 25.8 million people
  • 8.3% of the U.S. population. DIAGNOSED:
  • 18.8 million people. UNDIAGNOSED: 7.0 million people.

HEART DISEASES FACT:

American at Risk: the percentage of U.S. adults with heart disease risk factors (%):

  • Inactivity: 53%,
  • Obesity: 34%
  • High Blood Pressure: 32%,
  • Cigarette Smoking: 21%,
  • High Cholesterol: 15%,
  • Diabetes: 11%.


 

 

Treatment of Escherichia coli (O157:H7) inoculated alfalfa seeds and sprouts with electrolyzed oxidizing water

Posted by on Oct 20, 2014 in news | 0 comments

Treatment of Escherichia coli (O157:H7) inoculated alfalfa seeds and sprouts with electrolyzed oxidizing water

International Journal Food Microbiology 2003 Sep 15;86(3):231-7. Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Pennsylvania State University , University Park , PA 16802 , USA . Electrolyzed oxidizing water is a relatively new concept that has been utilized in agriculture, livestock management, medical sterilization, and food sanitation. Electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water generated by passing sodium chloride solution through an EO water generator was used to treat alfalfa seeds and sprouts inoculated with a five-strain cocktail of nalidixic acid resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7. EO water had a pH of 2.6, an oxidation-reduction potential of 1150 mV and about 50 ppm free chlorine. The percentage reduction in bacterial load was determined for reaction times of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 min. Mechanical agitation was done while treating the seeds at different time intervals to increase the effectiveness of the treatment. Since E. coli O157:H7 was released due to soaking during treatment, the initial counts on seeds and sprouts were determined by soaking the contaminated seeds/sprouts in 0.1% peptone water for a period equivalent to treatment time. The samples were then pummeled in 0.1% peptone water and spread plated on tryptic soy agar with 5 microg/ml of nalidixic acid (TSAN). Results showed that there were reductions between 38.2% and 97.1% (0.22-1.56 log(10) CFU/g) in the bacterial load of treated seeds. The reductions for sprouts were between 91.1% and 99.8% (1.05-2.72 log(10) CFU/g). An increase in treatment time increased the percentage reduction of E. coli O157:H7. However, germination of the treated seeds reduced from 92% to 49% as amperage to make EO water and soaking time increased. EO water did not cause any visible damage to the sprouts. PMID: 12915034 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Ionized Acid Water promotes substantially healthier plant...

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The Best and Worst States for Your Heart

Posted by on Jan 18, 2013 in Blog, news | 0 comments

The Best and Worst States for Your Heart

State-by-State Heart Health The study is the first to examine the nation’s heart health on a state-by-state basis. There were a few surprises, says CDC epidemiologist Jing Fang, MD, of the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention. The telephone survey included more than 350,000 people in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. They were asked about seven key heart health indicators: Blood pressure Total cholesterol Smoking status Weight (as measured by body mass index ) Diabetes Physical activity Fruit and vegetable consumption Based on the responses, the survey findings suggest that: Just 3% of U.S. adults have ideal heart health. About 10% adults in the U.S. have poor heart health. The states with the fewest people with optimal heart health are Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Mississippi. The places with the largest number of residents having no major risk factors for heart disease are Washington, D.C., Vermont, Virginia, and Connecticut. People living in New England and in the western U.S. generally have better heart health than those living in the South and Midwest. Just 14% of Oklahomans said they ate five or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day, compared to 31% of Washington, D.C., residents, the highest in the nation to meet this dietary goal. Just 3% of Americans Heart-Healthy Cardiologist Clyde W. Yancy, MD, says the real news in the survey is that so few American adults had none of the seven risk factors for heart disease. Yancy is chief of the division of cardiology at Chicago’s Northwestern Memorial Hospital and professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “We know that 80% of the burden of heart disease and stroke is preventable,” he says. “We have to get people to change their culture, to change their diets and their exercise patterns, and to treat their high blood pressure and high cholesterol . Each of the seven (risk factors) that were asked about in this survey can be addressed if people decide to do it.” American Heart Association President Donna K. Arnett, MD, agrees. “The number of people in the U.S. who have what the AHA would consider ideal cardiovascular health is low: only 3.3% of the population,” she says. “This reinforces the importance of the AHA’s goal of improving the cardiovascular health of all Americans by a factor of 20% by 2020. The report does show that there is not only need but much potential for improvement.” The study, which was funded by the CDC, was published online today in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Dec. 19, 2012 — Oklahoma may want to rethink parts of its official state meal — designated by the legislature in 1988 — which includes barbecue pork, chicken fried steak, sausage, biscuits and gravy, fried okra and squash, strawberries, black-eyed peas, grits, corn, cornbread, and pecan pie. A new survey released today by the CDC suggests that close to 99% of adults in the Sooner State have one or more risk factors or behaviors that increase risk for heart disease — the highest rate for any state in the nation. Oklahomans were also less likely to report eating five or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day than residents of any other state, and they were among the most likely to report being...

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