Osteoporosis

Vitamin D and Calcium Supplements May Not Prevent Fractures

Vitamin D and Calcium Supplements May Not Prevent Fractures

For most people, the evidence doesn’t support any bone benefit of the popular supplements. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), an independent group of health experts, reviewed research on the role of vitamin D and calcium supplements in preventing fractures, and found that adding 400 IU of vitamin D and 1000 mg of calcium to a healthy diet does not lower risk of fractures in post-menopausal women, and that for younger women and for men, the studies are too inconclusive to support regular use of the supplements. “It’s important to keep in mind that the presumption is that the people we are talking about here do not have known bone disease, they don’t have osteoporosis and they are not vitamin D deficient,” says the task force chair Dr. Virginia Moyer, a pediatrics professor at Baylor College of Medicine. “This is supplemental, so this is above and beyond getting what the expert consensus is for what you should be getting everyday.” See More: osteoporosis To come up with its recommendations, published in the the Annals of Internal Medicine, the Task Force commissioned two reviews of the available studies to date on the subject and a meta-analysis on vitamin D supplementation with or without calcium to investigate the association of vitamin D and calcium levels on bone health as well as the adverse effects of taking the pills. The task force concluded there isn’t enough evidence to show that getting more vitamin D and calcium than what healthy people get from their diet, and from healthy exposure to sunlight, which prompts vitamin D formation, offers much of a benefit. “Unfortunately for the studies that are out there, they have the regretable problem of having a wide variety of patient populations and a variety of doses. At the beginning it looks like there’s a lot of information, but actually there is a little bit of information here, and a little bit there, which is very hard to combine,” says Moyer. The task force is recommending against daily supplements of less than 400 IU of vitamin D and less than 1,000 mg of calcium for preventing fractures in postmenopausal women. “We are making it clear that using relative low doses is ineffective, but I think that is kind of known already,” says Moyer. On the other hand, the panel concluded that there was not enough evidence to make a recommendation on daily supplements greater than 400 IU of...

Read More

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis

The structure of the bones in our body as a “calcium bank.” When the condition of the body becomes more acidic, it self-balance by taking calcium from bones, making them brittle and break easily. The long-term alkaline water can prevent this destruction, because the alkaline calcium ion-containing chemical can mend the damage...

Read More

Pin It on Pinterest

error: Content is protected !!